Jul 15, 2024  
2018 Siena Heights University Catalog 
    
2018 Siena Heights University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Click here for further course code explanations and definitions; including The College of Professional Studies course delivery options.

  

 

English

  
  • ENG 345 British Literary History II


    3 credit hours

    Survey of major literary and linguistic movements in the British Isles from the Romantic Period to 1945. May focus on historical, social, religious, and cultural contexts of literary production.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2020
  
  • ENG 348 Multiethnic U.S. Literature


    3 credit hours

    Study of modern and contemporary literature produced by writers who self-identify as an ethnic minority. Close attention paid to the relationship between literature and the social and cultural constructions of ethnic identity. Students will be introduced to germane critical approaches.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA 2019
  
  
  • ENG 351 African-American Literature


    3 credit hours

    This survey course seeks to introduce students to the major works of African-American writers from 1760 to the present. It will examine the historical, psychological, and socio-political context in which this literature was produced. It will study the evolution of African-American writing as a literary art.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2020
  
  • ENG 354 Gender, Sexuality And Literature


    3 credit hours

    Study of the relationship between gender identity, sexuality, and literature. Close attention paid to literature written by women. Students will be introduced to germane critical approaches.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2019
  
  • ENG 356 Contemporary Literature


    3 credit hours

    This course critically examines a global literature since 1945. Close attention is paid to the historical and cultural contexts such as globalization and technological advancement. Students will be introduced to germane literary theory. Course will include a balance of European texts and non-European texts.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2020
  
  • ENG 357 Postcolonial Literature


    3 credit hours

    This course critically examines literature produced in colonial and postcolonial settings. Close attention is paid to the role of literature in resisting colonialism and shaping postcolonial states and identities. Students will be introduced to germane approaches to literary criticism.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA 2018
  
  • ENG 359 Catholic Literature


    3 credit hours

    This course will focus on issues of Catholic faith and culture as explored in works of literature. The course may include poetry, fiction, essays, and/or films from a diverse range of geographic locations and historical time periods. As a result of the course, students will recognize the Catholic imagination in various literary genres and traditions.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENG 362 Advanced Editing A Literary Journal: Eclipse


    2 credit hours

    In this course, students take a leadership role in producing Eclipse, Siena’s annual literary magazine. In this course students further hone their ability to solicit, select, edit, and produce materials for Eclipse. The content may include all genres of literature and fine arts. The staff designs the magazine, which includes layout, advertising, and plans for distribution.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENG 363 Advanced Publishing A Literary Journal: Eclipse


    1 credit hours

    In this course, students take a leadership role in the production components of Siena’s annual literary magazine, Eclipse. Students work with a professional graphic designer and publisher, who advise and assist in the process. Students in this course take a leadership role in finalizing layout, printing, advertising, and selling the magazine. As it takes a full year to produce Eclipse, ENG 363 may be taken as a continuation of ENG 362 Advanced Editing A Literary Journal: Eclipse  or as a new course.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 372 Secondary Methods


    2 credit hours

    Investigation through readings and teacher conferences of ways to bring middle and high school students to an understanding of the structure and beauty of language and literature and of techniques of effective writing. The student will keep file cards of readings, develop lesson plans, check them with the instructor, and present them to fellow students. Consideration will be given to multicultural/minority issues and students, as well as to exceptional students.

    Prerequisite:
    Corequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 396 Research Methods


    3 credit hours

    This course covers research methods and the advanced practice of literary scholarship. Requiring writing and research best suited to each specialization in the major, one of its outcomes will be a polished proposal for an ENG 495 Senior Tutorial  project to be presented to department faculty in April for approval.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 435 Visual Culture


    3 credit hours

    This course provides a broad overview of the critical theories and methodologies that have developed in the twentieth century that help explain the meaning of visual media from both high art and popular culture, including painting, photography, film, television, advertising, illustrated books, advertising, and the internet.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2019
  
  • ENG 445 Shakespeare


    3 credit hours

    Reading and analysis of several plays selected from the histories, comedies, and tragedies. Focus is primarily on textual analysis but covers as well sources, dramatic history, and criticism of plays studied. Overview of the development of drama from the medieval to renaissance periods. Students will write several essays, including one involving interpretation.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2020
  
  • ENG 480 Internship


    3 credit hours

    The internship is offered to give students practical experience in specialized areas of communication, such as journalism, public relations, advertising, editing, publishing, and media. Duties, workload, goals, and assessment will be arranged by the academic advisor and internship provider in consultation with the student.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: As needed, by permission
  
  • ENG 485 Special Topics


    3 credit hours

    The instructor teaching the course will determine the exact theme for the course that session. Students will closely read and analyze texts. Several longer papers will be required, which analyze the literature in depth.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENG 495 Senior Tutorial


    3 credit hours

    Intensive experience in research related to senior English majors’ cumulative paper/project. Individually designed by faculty and student in collaboration with the department.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year

Engineering

  
  • ENR 101 Fundamentals Of Engineering Design I


    3 credit hours

    This course will introduce students to the ideas of engineering design. It will expose students to the team based process of engineering design. Course will explore what is engineering design. The basic terminology of the design process will be examined. The iterative nature of the design process will also be explored. Students will employ the principles of design to build a project given real world constraints and specifications. Students will prepare a posted, present the poster, and demonstrate the completed project at the end of the term.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENR 104 Computer Aided Drafting


    3 credit hours

    An introduction methods and practices of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD). Design in 2 and 3 Dimensions will be covered. Design will be accomplished through the use of CAD software. Course activities will expose students to the application of design in various areas of Theater and Engineering. 

    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENR 140 Programming I


    3 credit hours

    This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming and algorithm development. It covers basic software input and output, flow of control, classes, and arrays. It also emphasizes good program design and documentation. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENR 149 Introduction To Electrical Engineering


    1 credit hours

    The course offers an introduction to the field of electrical engineering. The course will introduce students to the scope and diversity of electrical engineering and its subfields. Students will gain a basic exposure to electronics. Students will complete a final project and a final paper/presentation.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENR 249 Engineering Mechanics Statics


    3 credit hours

    This course will cover a vector approach to principles of statics. Concepts of consideration will include free body diagrams. Applications to simple trusses, frames, and machines. Distributed loads. Shear and moment diagrams. Properties of areas, second moments. Laws of friction.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENR 259 Circuit Analysis


    4 credit hours

    The course offers an introduction to basic circuit analysis. Both the development and application of circuit, theory, electronics, and energy conversion are introduced.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENR 285 Special Topics


    1-4 credit hours

    Dependent upon topic. 

    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENR 342 Industrial Ecology and Sustainability


    3 credit hours

    This is an interdisciplinary course focusing on the theory of industrial ecology, sustainable development and their practical applications. Ecological, economic, social, political, and technological perspectives will be considered. Practical applications covered in the course will be based largely on research activities in the area of life cycle assessment (LCA), a comprehensive tool for identifying and evaluating the full environmental burdens associated with a product system from production through retirement. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA 2020, FA 2023
  
  • ENR 349 Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics


    3 credit hours

    This course is an introduction to Dynamics. It is intended to give a rigorous foundation for the analysis of motions of particles and rigid bodies and the physical laws governing the motions of particles and rigid bodies.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENR 359 Engineering Thermodynamics


    3 credit hours

    The course offers an introduction to basic laws of thermodynamics. This includes applications of the first and second laws to both compressible and incompressible fluids. The application of these laws to solving engineering problems is stressed.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENR 369 Mechanics of Materials


    3 credit hours

    This course is an introduction to simple stress and strain, the mechanical properties of materials, torsion, axial load, shearing and bending moment, flexture and shear stress of beams, stress transformation, statistically indeterminate members and columns. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENR 395 Junior Seminar in Environmental Engineering I


    1 credit hours

    Students will become familiar with current environmental science literature. Current topics and experimental approaches will be emphasized. Journal articles covering a range of disciplines with which students have some familiarity will be read and discussed in depth by the class. 

    Prerequisite:
    • Permission of Instructor and Junior Standing

    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  
  • ENR 441 Environmental Regulations


    3 credit hours

    Principles of environmental compliance obligations, common law, trespass, nuisance, and negligence will be addressed.  The major federal environmental laws affecting companies and agencies, and selected state and local regulations. Civil and criminal penalties and liabilities attached to environmental regulations. Strategies for compliance include proactive and environmental management as a method for reducing legal exposure to environmental issues.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2021, WI 2024
  
  • ENR 485 Special Topics


    1-4 credit hours

    Dependent upon topic. 

    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENR 495 Senior Seminar in Environmental Engineering I


    1 credit hours

    Students will work on their senior projects, and each student will give a practice paper presentation. Seminars will cover topics such as how to give scientific presentations, how to prepare posters, planning for graduate and professional schools, preparation for GRE, MCAT and other national exams, and other professional concerns. 

    Prerequisite:
    Laboratory Fee: $50
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  

Environmental Science

  
  • ENV 110 Introduction To Environmental Science


    4 credit hours

    A course designed for majors in Environmental Science which focuses on people and their environment. Basic ecological principles, sustainability, human populations and pollution will be considered. Does not count toward major or minor in biology or integrated science.

    Prerequisite: None
    Laboratory Fee: $50
    Liberal Arts: Science
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENV 122 Geology


    4 credit hours

    The scientific study of the Earth, its origin, structure, surface features, composition and processes involved in its development will be addressed.

    Prerequisite: None
    Laboratory Fee: $50
    Liberal Arts: Science
    Course is Offered: FA 2018
  
  • ENV 141 Climatology


    3 credit hours

    Study of the elements and controls of weather and climate, climate changes, distribution and characteristics of climatic regions will be addressed.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2020
  
  • ENV 152 Oceanography


    3 credit hours

    This course deals with aspects of geology, chemistry, physics, climatology, environmental science and biology as they apply to the oceans. Its goal is to present science in a social context and to give students the foundation needed to be intelligent participants in important societal discussions that involve environmental issues touching on oceans, climate and coastal zones.

    Prerequisite: Permission
    Laboratory Fee: $85
    Course is Offered: WI 2019
  
  • ENV 342 Industrial Ecology And Sustainability


    3 credit hours

    This is an interdisciplinary course focusing on the theory of industrial ecology, sustainable development and their practical applications. Ecological, economic, social, political, and technological perspectives will be considered. Practical applications covered in the course will be based largely on research activities in the area of life cycle assessment (LCA), a comprehensive tool for identifying and evaluating the full environmental burdens associated with a product system from production through retirement.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA 2020
  
  • ENV 380 Environmental Certifications


    2 credit hours

    Includes certifications in the following areas: Safety Training, Hazardous Materials Transportation, RCRA Hazardous Waste Generator, Stormwater Operator and ISO 14001. This course is offered credit/no credit only.

    Prerequisite: Permission
    Course is Offered: WI 2021
  
  • ENV 395 Junior Seminar In Environmental Science I


    1 credit hours

    Students will become familiar with current environmental science literature. Current topics and experimental approaches will be emphasized. Journal articles covering a range of disciplines with which students have some familiarity will be read and discussed in depth by the class.

    Prerequisite: Sophomore or Junior Standing
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENV 396 Junior Seminar In Environmental Science II


    1 credit hours

    During this course, students will select their research topic. The course will focus on how to write a project proposal, experimental design, scientific ethics, research statistics, scientific computing, and other topics relevant to particular projects or approaches.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENV 441 Environmental Regulations


    3 credit hours

    Principles of environmental compliance obligations, common law, trespass, nuisance, and negligence will be addressed. The major federal environmental laws affecting companies and agencies, and selected state and local regulations. Civil and criminal penalties and liabilities attached to environmental regulations. Strategies for compliance include proactive and environmental management as a method for reducing legal exposure to environmental issues.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2021
  
  • ENV 450 Terrestrial Ecology & Field Biology


    4 credit hours

    An introduction to the complex relationships and networks between organisms and their environment, taught in seminar style with discussions based on assigned textbook chapters and other readings. The course includes several field trips to important ecosystems in Michigan and Ohio where field methods to study climate, soil, plant and animal communities are practiced. The concept of sustainability is an integral part of this course, and the course ends with a discussion of global ecology and human impact on the biosphere.

    Prerequisite:
    Laboratory Fee: $50
    Course is Offered: FA 2019, FA 2021
  
  • ENV 451 Fresh Water Ecology and Field Biology


    4 credit hours

    This course studies the unique physical and chemical properties of water that have contributed to the origins of life, describes important freshwater ecosystems characterized by flowing water and standing water, and integrates this knowledge with the study of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Included are several field trips to important freshwater ecosystems in Michigan, where field methods to describe limnic habitats and study macrophytes, benthos, and plankton are practiced. The course ends with a discussion of human impact on freshwater ecosystems on a local, regional and global scale. The concept of sustainability is an integral part of this course.

    Prerequisite:
    Laboratory Fee: $50
    Course is Offered: FA 2018, FA 2020, FA 2022
  
  • ENV 452 Hydrogeology


    3 credit hours

    This course will cover surface water and water budgets, floods and flood frequency analysis, groundwater supply, steady state and non-steady state flow, hydrogeologic regimes, and introductory groundwater chemistry.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2021
  
  • ENV 495 Senior Seminar I


    1 credit hours

    Students will work on their senior projects, and each student will give a practice paper presentation. Seminars will cover topics such as how to give scientific presentations, how to prepare posters, planning for graduate and professional schools, preparation for GRE, MCAT, and other national exams, and other professional concerns.

    Prerequisite:
    Laboratory Fee: $50
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENV 496 Senior Seminar II


    1 credit hours

    Students will finish their senior project research, write it up, and prepare their finishing seminar and their poster.

    Prerequisite:
    Laboratory Fee: $50
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year

English as a Second Language

  
  • ESL 071 Beginners Reading


    2 credit hours

    This course serves as an introduction to reading for learners of English as a second language. The course will stress the following skills: simple reading comprehension, vocabulary enrichment, and basic paraphrase and discussion skills.

  
  • ESL 072 Beginners Grammar


    2 credit hours

    As in reading, the focus in the Grammar 072 course is speaking and listening comprehension. Students will learn basic English language structures (subject, verb, object), basic English syntax, essential simple (present) verb tenses, and the basics of English parts of speech (nouns, adjectives, pronouns, prepositions, articles, verbs, adverbs, and conjunctions).

  
  • ESL 073 Beginners Writing


    2 credit hours

    This course reinforces Reading 071. Toward the beginning of the course, students learn the alphabet and transcribe words from simple dictation. Students learn to read aloud. As in reading 071, students play word games that help them learn simple, important everyday questions and how to answer the same. In some activities, students work in small groups and interview one another. As the term progresses, students begin to compose compositions from models made available to them. The course includes fundamental practice with simple description in the present tense.

  
  • ESL 074 Beginners Speaking


    2 credit hours

    This course combines speaking and pronunciation. Students learn to converse in standard, daily situations (common greetings, simple conversations) with emphasis on pattern practice, question and answer drills and listening comprehension from slow dictation.

  
  • ESL 081 Intermediate Reading


    2 credit hours

    The course focuses on reading comprehension, vocabulary enrichment, and speaking skills. The reading materials and companion exercises progress from very simple passages to grammatically more sophisticated selections. The readings are longer, as well. Reading assignments consist of the following phases: pre-reading (vocabulary work), reading (first reading without pause, second reading to identify problem words and phrases, third reading for more complete comprehension), and paraphrase and discussion (in class).

  
  • ESL 082 Intermediate Grammar


    2 credit hours

    Students in this course continue to learn English grammar as a means of speaking and writing better. Course content includes work with the simple past and simple future tenses, count and non-count nouns, subject-verb agreement, and basic modal auxiliaries

  
  • ESL 083 Intermediate Writing


    2 credit hours

    Students will incorporate concepts learned in their grammar class into their daily compositions, such as the simple past tense to describe sequential actions, the future tense to describe what will occur after class, the coming week, and in the coming years, and modals to describe possibilities and conjecture. Most assignments will be short, descriptive or narrative compositions. Students will write every day and keep a log of their daily activities (a diary). The instructor will correct student compositions, hand them back, and students will rewrite them with the corrections in an individual copybook meant for polished work. Students will also work with concepts of brainstorming and peer editing.

  
  • ESL 084 Intermediate Speaking


    2 credit hours

    Students in this course will learn to employ grammar as a speaking tool while learning essential vocabulary for their daily speaking needs. As always, the course is based on the communicative approach to teaching and learning English. Students will join in many small group activities where they will have the opportunity to develop their speaking and listening comprehension skills.

  
  • ESL 091 High Intermediate Reading


    2 credit hours

    The course focuses on reading strategies that enhance the reader’s ability to understand written texts with increasing efficiency and retention. Students continue to work and develop skimming, scanning, and anticipation strategies. Students also continue to learn how to understand new words in the contexts in which they appear. As in all of the reading courses, students will hone their paraphrase and discussion skills.

  
  • ESL 092 High Intermediate Grammar


    2 credit hours

    The primary goal of this course is assimilation of grammatical concepts. The course teaches students already familiar with verb tenses, parts of speech, and primary syntax to employ these concepts in more fluent communications, spoken and written. The course begins with a thorough review of verb tenses, proper spelling and pronunciation. Students then proceed to explore adverb clauses of time and detailed noun and pronoun usage.

  
  • ESL 093 High Intermediate Writing


    2 credit hours

    This course teaches students how to organize written communications that go beyond the sentence and paragraph level. In addition to practicing previously learned forms of expression, such as simple description and narratives, students begin to organize paragraphs in the larger context of complete compositions. Students will learn to create outlines for their compositions and in doing so will begin to work with the essential components of essays: introduction, body, and conclusion. It is at this point that students study and begin to employ topic sentences at both the paragraph and larger essay level (introduction) and learn to develop their ideas as parts of a cohesive whole.

  
  • ESL 094 High Intermediate Speaking


    2 credit hours

    Students in this course will learn to employ grammar as a speaking tool while learning essential vocabulary for their daily speaking needs. As always, the course is based on the communicative approach to language teaching and learning.

  
  • ESL 110 Business English


    3 credit hours

    Students may learn the specialized vocabulary and jargon of any business.

    Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled at the ESL 150 level (High Advanced).
  
  • ESL 141 Advanced Reading


    2 credit hours

    The course focuses on reading strategies that enhance the reader’s ability to understand written texts with increasing efficiency and retention. Students continue to work and develop skimming, scanning, and anticipation strategies. Students also continue to learn how to understand new words in the contexts in which they appear. As in all of the reading courses, students will hone their paraphrase and discussion skills.

  
  • ESL 142 Advanced Grammar


    2 credit hours

    This course focuses on modals, the passive voice, and noun and adjective dependent clauses. As always, the course emphasizes the use of these concepts in spoken and written communications.

  
  • ESL 143 Advanced Writing


    2 credit hours

    In this course students begin to prepare for academic writing. The course addresses the organization, rhetoric, grammar and mechanics, and sentence structure of quality essays. Students are taken from prewriting through all the steps of the writing process. The course teaches paragraph and essay forms in simple, learnable steps through extensive models and writing practice.

  
  • ESL 144 Advanced Speaking


    2 credit hours

    Students in this course will learn to employ grammar as a speaking tool while learning essential vocabulary for their daily speaking needs. As always, the course is based on the communicative approach to language teaching and learning.

  
  • ESL 151 High Advanced Reading


    2 credit hours

    This course is designed for students who are about to embark upon a college education in the United States. The readings are eclectic. They include selections featuring science, the arts and humanities, history, and other social sciences, and they are complete with extensive vocabulary work and discussion activities. Students enrolling in this course should expect the readings to be as varied and unexpected as those assigned by university professors on a daily basis for discussion and elaboration. In addition to extensive vocabulary work, the course includes timed readings for enhanced reading speed and comprehension, and daily work with paraphrase and discussion skills. The classroom resembles a university classroom. The course is founded on this principle: that the secret to learning how to read is to read voluminously.

  
  • ESL 152 High Advanced Grammar


    2 credit hours

    Much of the course involves further exploration of dependent clauses and their use: adjective clauses, coordinating conjunctions, reduction of adverb clauses, connectives of cause and effect, and conditional sentences (“if” clauses). Students will also work with gerund and infinitive verb complements.

  
  • ESL 153 High Advanced Writing


    2 credit hours

    While it is true that ESL students will continue to improve their writing skills for years after the conclusion of their second language studies, it is also true that at the conclusion of this writing course, students will have made great strides toward composing academic essays and papers in the English language. They can bring their writing assignments into the class for guidance and assistance from the instructor.

  
  • ESL 154 High Advanced Speaking


    2 credit hours

    This will be a thoroughly communicative classroom affording students ample opportunity to practice their English speaking and listening skills in meaningful task and proficiency based exercises. In addition to their communicative nature, these activities continue to acquaint students with a broad range of useful, everyday vocabulary. The topics include Internet, the stock market, university life, shopping, food, clothes, banking, business, transportation, taxes, and many other useful subjects.


Finance

  
  • FIN 209 Personal Finance


    3 credit hours

    This course enables students to be good financial decision-makers and wise financial service consumers. Using practical economic principles such as risk, rationality, opportunity costs and the time value of money, they learn how to bank and save, when and where to invest, how to manage credit cards and student loans, whether to rent or to buy housing, to lease or buy autos. Students consider career planning in light of their lifetime income, security and personal success goals. The course features problems, case studies, self-quizzes, and Internet projects. Students may not earn credit for both this course and FIN 309 Personal Financial Planning . Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FIN 285 Special Topics


    1-3 credit hours

    Dependent upon topic.

    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FIN 309 Personal Financial Planning


    3 credit hours

    This course helps students become active managers and effective planners of their financial future–consistent with their personal values and life goals. Tailored to their adult life cycle stage, they develop assigned elements of an integrated personal financial plan: saving, managing taxes, investing, managing credit; major purchases; insurance; retirement and estate planning. Students prepare financial statements and budgets, employ online calculators and tools, research and evaluate financial alternatives for planning a wedding, funding a college education, refinancing a mortgage, caring for aging parents or other plans. Students may not earn credit for both this course and FIN 209 Personal Finance . Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FIN 322 Investments


    3 credit hours

    This course blends theory and practice while surveying worldwide markets and a variety of individual investment options, including mutual funds. Students learn top-down, industry and technical analyses; also how to value individual stocks, real estate, fixed income and hybrid securities. They compare growth, value, and indexing styles and examine the roles of asset allocation, diversification, and international investments in managing risk and return. Students explore futures, options, duration, capital market theory, researching and investing online. They construct a model portfolio, measure and evaluate their financial performance. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FIN 340 Managerial Finance


    3 credit hours

    Develops students as active financial analysts, planners and decision-makers at the operating and strategy setting levels. Applying their Accounting and Economics knowledge, students address financial analysis, capital budgeting, long-term financing and working capital management–all with the aim of maximizing resource efficiency and effectiveness. This course considers the financial consequences of marketing and management decisions, and emphasizes increased market globalization and online information accessibility. Students are strongly urged to take Macroeconomics before or with Managerial Finance. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • FIN 348 Money And Capital Markets


    3 credit hours

    Introduces students to financial systems in our global economy. Systems include the market roles of governments, central banks, businesses, consumers, financial intermediaries and capital sources. Students learn what determines capital costs, how to forecast rates, where to raise money and how to manage financial risks in money, fixed income, mortgage, venture capital and primary equity markets. Special emphasis is given to managing banks and nonbanks as well as evaluating and selecting their services. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FIN 440 Financing New Ventures


    3 credit hours

    Students will learn how to value a business. Forecasting and budgeting as it pertains to new ventures will be examined. Sources of entrepreneurial equity from self-financing through venture investors (IVs) will be explained. Students will learn how investment decisions are determined and will present their completed business plans to potential investors. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FIN 450 International Finance


    3 credit hours

    This course explores global financial markets and the financial operations of a multinational firm. The first part of the course covers concepts related to the foreign exchange markets, currency derivative markets, global risk management, principles of hedging and arbitrage. The second part examines investment and financing decisions of a firm within the international environment. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FIN 463 Financial Statement Analysis


    3 credit hours

    Enables students to navigate, explore, and interpret financial statements to develop informed judgments, communicate sound recommendations and make quality business decisions. This course is for investors, credit analysts, job seekers, advancing Accounting and Finance professionals. Relying upon annual reports, 10-Ks, 10-Qs and other sources, students apply analytical tools to assess: liquidity, solvency, risk, earnings quality, operating efficiency and effectiveness. The course features self-tests, Internet problems and cases. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FIN 485 Special Topics


    1-3 credit hours

    Dependent upon topic. 

    Course is Offered: Uncertain

French

  
  • FRE 101 Elementary French I


    4 credit hours

    A basic course in the French language in which the student masters the basic vocabulary, sentence structure, and verb conjugations. Includes the practice of conversation and pronunciation, grammar and structure, writing and composition, reading and translation skills.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • FRE 140 Elementary French II


    4 credit hours

    This course is a continuation of French 101. Instruction includes such basic grammar as all the major verb tense structures and an increase of idiomatic expressions. Instruction includes the practice of conversation and pronunciation, grammar and structure, writing and composition, reading and translation skills.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain

Geography

  
  • GEO 301 Cultural Geography I


    3 credit hours

    Students will explore the places and cultures of North America, South America, and Europe, examining the interaction between peoples and their environments. Emphasis on discernible patterns and processes within regions and across them will also be addressed.

    Prerequisite: None
    Liberal Arts: Social Science
    Course is Offered: WI 2019
  
  • GEO 302 Cultural Geography II


    3 credit hours

    Students will explore the places and cultures of Asia, Africa, and Oceana, examining the interaction between peoples and their environments. Emphasis on discernible patterns and processes within regions and across them will also be addressed. 

    Prerequisite: None
    Liberal Arts: Social Science
    Course is Offered: FA 2019
  
  • GEO 303 Political Geography


    3 credit hours

    Study of geographical bases of political national states and nationalism and the processes of political nation building and devolution. This course will present the geographic context of major global issues and events including considerations of changes and patterns in the world political map, and contemporary geopolitical questions, their causes and consequences.

    Prerequisite: None
    Liberal Arts: Social Science
    Course is Offered: WI 2020
  
  • GEO 306 Geography Of The Middle East


    3 credit hours

    Students will explore the places and cultures that are home to the people of the Middle East, examining the interaction between peoples and their environments. Students’ will develop a geographical perspective on economic activities evaluating the relative influence of location, movement, and connections as well as the significance of the geographical context for understanding issues and events in the Middle East. Emphasis is on discernible patterns and processes within the Middle East as well as between it and other regions of the world.

    Prerequisite: None
    Liberal Arts: Social Science
    Course is Offered: Uncertain

Gerontology

  
  
  • GER 285 Special Topics


    1-3 credit hours

    Dependent upon topic. 

    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • GER 341 Health Issues In Human Aging


    3 credit hours

    A study of the biology of aging in humans, including diseases which commonly affect the elderly population. Students will examine the interaction between biological, psychological, social, and economic factors, all of which influence the experience of aging.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2019
  
  
  • GER 480 Gerontology Internship


    3 credit hours

    The internships will provide students with direct experience working with older adults. Students will select agencies or institutions providing care and services to the aging as their internship sites. Students will strengthen their skills to work with and support older adults. One hundred and fifty (150) clock hours at the internship site are required of the student. The students will have class meetings, group and individual meetings to discuss the process of the internship. Students will also complete a variety of assignments including final report and presentation of their internship experience.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA, WI, and SU Every Year
  
  • GER 485 Special Topics In Gerontology


    3 credit hours

    Course descriptions will reflect topics offered.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain

Health Care Management

  
  • HCM 300 Accounting for Health Care Professionals


    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the preparation and use of accounting information in health care organizations. 

    Course is Offered: WI1 2019
  
  • HCM 301 Perspectives In Health Care Management


    3 credit hours

    The purpose of this course is to provide a survey of concepts and methodologies basic to a variety of managerial disciplines (organizational behavior, planning/marketing, operational research, financial management, the law, etc.) which are directly applicable to the management of health services organizations.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA 2018, WI 2019, SU1 2019

    At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus

  
  • HCM 335 Information Technology in Health Care


    3 credit hours

    An introduction to information technology used in health care organizations.

    Course is Offered: SU1 2019
  
  • HCM 336 Quality Improvement & Customer Service in Health Care


    3 credit hours

    Concepts and organizational factors that influence service delivery and quality in health care. 

    Course is Offered: WI2 2019
  
  • HCM 440 Medical Ethics/Legal Aspects Of Health Care


    3 credit hours

    This course examines the medical field’s regulatory environment and the tensions among ethical, financial and medical considerations. From a manager’s point of view, the student explores laws which affect patient care, employer-employee relations, and profitability. Special topics include the duty to treat, disclosure and privacy, and the decision-making process. Also covered are the medical professional’s liability for the actions of others and for the consequences of decisions. These topics will be examined in the context of ethical principles.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA1 2018, WI 2019, SU2 2019

    At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus

  
  • HCM 441 Financial Management Of Health Care Institutions


    3 credit hours

    This course is intended to improve decision makers’ understanding and use of financial information in the health care industry. Its aim is to make health care finance relevant for decision makers in the health care industry through the understanding and application of finance principles to health care issues.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA2 2018, WI 2019, SU1 2019

    At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus

  
  • HCM 444 Strategic Planning In Healthcare Management


    3 credit hours

    This course presents a general overview of the strategic planning process in health service organizations. In comparison to operational management, this course will emphasize the planning function of health care management with an external orientation. Students will be exposed to directional strategies, such as mission, vision, values and goals, as well as external and internal environmental assessment and strategy formulation.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA2 2018, WI 2019, SU2 2019

    At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus

  
  • HCM 485 Special Topics


    1-3 credit hours

    Dependent upon topic. 

    Course is Offered: Uncertain

History

  
  • HIS 111 World Civilizations Since 1500


    3 credit hours

    This course provides an overview of the development of major eras and key people, ideas and events in world civilization from the discovery of the Americas to the contemporary age. This course will study causes and effects of critical turning points, significant decisions, and the relationships among operative factors through analysis and interpretation of the past. 

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
 

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