Jun 14, 2024  
2018 Siena Heights University Catalog 
    
2018 Siena Heights University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Click here for further course code explanations and definitions; including The College of Professional Studies course delivery options.

  

 

Clinical Mental Health Counseling

  
  • CMH 602 Research And Professional Writing In Counseling


    3 credit hours

    Required of all counseling students, except in situations when a previous research course, at the graduate level, is accepted for transfer from another University. Examines the role of research in developing the counseling profession, including how to critique research to substantiate best practice in clinical mental health counseling. Overviews basic statistical methods utilized in research and examines quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method designs. Discusses design and analysis of needs assessment, program evaluation, and counseling outcome measures. Reviews ethical standards related to research in counseling. Explores culturally-sensitive strategies for designing, implementing, interpreting, and reporting the results of research, program evaluation, and counseling outcome measurement.

  
  • CMH 620 Foundations Of Clinical Mental Health Counseling


    3 credit hours

    A survey course designed to present the history, philosophy, core values and trends in the counseling profession and, specifically, in clinical mental health counseling. Explores counselor roles, functions and relationships with other human service providers, including those related to advocacy, social justice, outreach and emergency response. Discusses differences between prevention and intervention. Examines mental health delivery and managed care systems. Overviews credentialing, licensure and professional organizations pertinent to counseling specialties, including mental health counseling. Explores the expanding role of technology, including social networking, in counseling.

  
  • CMH 623 Psychology Over The Lifespan


    3 credit hours

    Explores a variety of perspectives on individual and family development including: cognitive, psychodynamic, existential, systems and neurobiological. Surveys personality theory. Explores situational and environmental factors that affect development, including transitional crises and trauma. Explores theories for facilitating optimal development and resilience across the lifespan. Explores the impact of exceptionality and disability on human development.

  
  • CMH 626 Relationship-Building In Counseling


    3 credit hours

    This competency-based laboratory course, focuses on acquiring and developing counseling skills fundamental to the relationship-building and exploratory phases of the counseling process. Students explore the impact of counselor characteristics and behaviors on the counseling process. Students engage in reflective activities designed to strengthen counselor resilience, to heighten awareness of personal values and to enhance appreciation of client strengths and potentials.

    Prerequisite: Prerequisites: CMH 620 Foundations Of Clinical Mental Health Counseling  and CMH 623 Psychology Over The Lifespan  
  
  • CMH 629 Counseling Theories And Procedures


    3 credit hours

    A survey of major counseling theories: historical, contemporary and emergent. This course is designed to help students appreciate the theoretical grounding and research behind various counseling techniques and procedures and to help them begin to develop an integrated personal theory of counseling. Discusses the use of research to inform evidence-based practice.

  
  • CMH 632 Ethics And Legal Issues In Counseling


    3 credit hours

    This course addresses the wide array of ethical and legal issues faced by contemporary counselors. Students will become familiar with the codes of ethics of the American Counseling Association and the Association of Clinical Mental Health Counselors. They will learn frameworks for making ethical decisions and will apply an understanding of ethical and legal issues to case scenarios. Students will become familiar with both HIPPA and FERPA, as well as with legislation and case law related to counseling in Michigan. They will explore the developing body of work on ethics for counselors in the digital age.

    Prerequisite: CMH 620 Foundations Of Clinical Mental Health Counseling  and CMH 626 Relationship-Building In Counseling  
  
  • CMH 635 Group Procedures In Counseling


    3 credit hours

    An applied approach to counseling with groups, in this course experiential and laboratory methods are utilized to develop group skills. Participants learn about group theories, group processes and dynamics, and about facilitation styles. Methods of evaluating group effectiveness are covered.

  
  • CMH 638 Counseling Diverse Populations


    3 credit hours

    Designed to explore theories, models and research related to identity development in a diverse world and to multicultural counseling. Incorporate experiential activities to foster understanding of self and culturally diverse clients. Explores the counselor’s role in social justice and advocacy for diverse populations. Explores counselor’s role in eliminating bias, prejudice, oppression and discrimination. A grade of “B” or better required to continue in program.

  
  • CMH 641 Career Development


    3 credit hours

    This course addresses 1) the history and future of career counseling in a diverse, global economy, 2) career development theories, 3) measurement instruments and processes for work-related preferences, abilities, and special needs, 4) career information databases related to job market and labor trends, 5) skills related to career decision making and planning across the lifespan, 6) contemporary work-life balance issues, 7) career counseling processes and 8) the development and administration of career guidance programs.

    Prerequisite: None
  
  
  • CMH 647 Psychopathology And Resilience


    3 credit hours

    Explores definitions of and continuum between mental health and mental illness. Explores manifestations of abnormal behavior, including organic conditions and personality problems in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age. Considers data from commonly utilized personality measurements. Explores models, both traditional and strengths-based, for promoting wellness and resilience across the continuum of mental health and mental illness among individuals, families, and communities.

    Prerequisite:
  
  • CMH 651 Diagnosis For Counselors


    2 credit hours

    Utilizing theoretical and case study approaches, this course studies the evolution and application of the DSM and ICD in clinical practice, with a particular emphasis on the shifting understanding of diagnosis represented in the DSM-5. Explores the benefits of and limitations to utilizing the DMS-5. Develops a framework for recognizing and identifying symptoms and dynamics of mental and emotional disorders. Explores the differences between diagnosable disorders and developmentally appropriate reactions during crises, disasters, and events perceived as traumatic. Examines the multicultural implications of using common diagnostic tools.

    Prerequisite:
  
  • CMH 652 Psychopharmacology For Counselors


    2 credit hours

    Examines the biological mechanisms of psychopharmacological interventions for the treatment of mental and emotional disorders. Explores the history of psychopharmacological interventions. Overviews basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly-prescribed medications for specific disorders. Discusses common side-effects and drug-drug interactions for psychopharmacological agents. Explores the role of the counselor in referring for medication evaluations and in collaborating with prescribing providers.

  
  
  
  
  • CMH 665 Consulting Theory And Practice


    3 credit hours

    An examination of the theories and procedures of consulting and the change process. Introduces consultation as a concept used to inspire conceptual thinking for helping individuals, groups, and organizations function more effectively and efficiently. Explores effective program evaluation and needs assessment strategies.

  
  
  
  • CMH 678 Relationship And Sexuality Counseling


    2 credit hours

    Overviews contemporary theories and practices related to counseling relationships, including ethnicity and gender issues in assessment and treatment. Surveys common sexuality concerns and disorders encountered when treating couples. The course is designed to increase trainees’ comfort level in assessing and treating relationship issues, including sexuality. Students uncomfortable with explicit discussion of sexual issues, attitudes, behaviors and practices should consider whether participation in this course is appropriate for them.

  
  
  • CMH 683 Counseling Internship 1 / Conceptualization


    3 credit hours

    The Counseling Internship is an individualized, on-the-job, intensive counseling experience requiring 600 clock hours with 240 hours of direct client contact under professional supervision. The Internship provides the counselor trainee an opportunity to perform all activities expected of a regularly employed counselor in a clinical or school setting. The Internship experience (Seminars 1 and 2) spans two (2) semesters (approximately 33-34 weeks), allowing the counselor trainee sufficient time to develop entry level practitioner skills. Internship 1 is a regularly scheduled campus seminar focusing on processing the internship experience. The didactic segment of Internship 1 will assist students with conceptualizing client cases, developing service plans, providing treatment, and assessing outcomes. Attendance is mandatory.

    Prerequisite: A grade of “B” or better in CMH 680 Counseling Field Practicum , and approval of Counselor Education Program Director. Application required. Final presentation of portfolio required. A grade of “B” or better required to continue in program.
  
  • CMH 684 Counseling Internship 2 / NCE Preparation


    3 credit hours

    During the Internship 2 seminar, students continue to accrue hours in fulfillment of the required 600 clock hours with 240 direct hours of direct client contact under professional supervision. Students will continue to process client cases and their internship experience. The didactic segment of Internship 2 will focus on preparing students to take and pass the National Counseling Examination. Final presentation of portfolio required. A grade of “B” or better required to complete program.

  
  • CMH 685 Internship Extender Seminar


    1 credit hours

    Intended only for students who do not complete field hours during Counseling Internship 1 and 2, the Extender Seminar provides independent, but regular, contact with faculty until all internship requirements are completed. Faculty continue to provide liaison with field placement site personnel. Course may be repeated two times.

  

Communications

  
  • COM 111 Introduction To Communications


    3 credit hours

    This course introduces the history and foundational concepts and theories of the study of human communication. With an emphasis on critical analysis, students will examine the social and cultural implications of communication, from interpersonal communication to mass media. Students will also develop their public speaking skills through oral presentations and projects. 

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • COM 245 Communications Theory


    3 credit hours

    This course examines in detail a variety of different approaches to the study of human communication. Through the close study of individual communications theories, written assignments, and presentations, students learn to analyze a variety of types of communication (interpersonal, group, organizational, rhetoric, media, intercultural, etc.) through the application of theory to their everyday lives and experiences. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Odd Year
  
  • COM 285 Special Topics


    3 credit hours

    A close examination on a particular theme, topic, or current event related to the study of human communications, to be determined by the instructor teaching the course that session. Students will read, analyze, and research topics related to the course theme, with the goal of productive conversation an a better understanding of the diverse field of Communications. 

    Prerequisite: Based on course topic. 
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
    Repeatable: This course is repeatable.
  
  • COM 340 Intercultural Communication


    3 credit hours

    This course explores the study of communication and interaction within and across a variety of cultures, from the interpersonal level to the global level. Emphasis is on the ways in which globalization, politics, and current events impact the ways individuals and cultures communicate. Through discussion and assignments, students will learn to analyze the challenges of intercultural communication and develop/apply solutions for effective communication in their future careers and everyday lives. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Even Year
  
  • COM 352 History Of The Mass Media


    3 credit hours

    This course explores the history and development of mass media, examining  a variety of forms: print, film radio, television, Internet, etc. The emphasis is on understanding and analyzing the social, cultural, economic, ethical, and political implications of these media forms as they both respond to and impact shifts in culture and society. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Even Year
  
  
  • COM 480 Internship


    3 credit hours

    The internship is offered to give students practical experience in specialized areas of communication, such as journalism, public relations, advertising, editing, publishing, and media. Duties, workload, goals, and assessment will be arranged by the academic advisor and internship provider in consultation with the student.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: By Permission
  
  • COM 485 Special Topics


    3 credit hours

    A close examination on a particular theme, topic, or current event related to the study of human communications, to be determined by the instructor teaching the course that semester. Students will read, analyze, and research topics related to the course theme, with the goal of productive conversation and a well-researched and analyzed project/paper/presentation. 

    Prerequisite: Based on course topic. 
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
    Repeatable: This course is repeatable.
  
  • COM 495 Senior Tutorial


    3 credit hours

    Intensive experience in research related to senior Communication majors’ cumulative paper/project. Individually designed by faculty and student in collaboration with the department.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRJ 101 Introduction To Criminal Justice


    3 credit hours

    A survey of the philosophical and historical trends that make up the criminal justice system. Also included is an evaluation of the criminal justice system including: current trends, career orientation, agencies and processes.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 140 Introduction To Corrections


    3 credit hours

    This course will present a historical review of correctional and penal institutions as well as the current state of achievement. It will also stress the needs and directions for future efforts.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 240 Report Writing For The Criminal Justice Professional


    3 credit hours

    This course will provide students specific advice, writing examples, and guidelines for law enforcement, corrections, probation and parole. Detailed examples and practice will be used to demonstrate to students how to write for maximum documentation that will hold up in court, utilizing grammar, mechanics, various speakers, and modernization methods.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 241 Criminal Justice, Fact And Fiction


    3 credit hours

    This course will be taught at the Gus Harrison Correctional Facility. Ten students per session from SHU will learn with inmates in an inside/outside learning environment. The class focus will be the Criminal Justice systems (law enforcement, corrections, courts), through fiction and non-fiction sources. All university policies and rules will apply along with Gus Harrison policies.

    Prerequisite: Junior Status and permission
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 242 Families And Criminal Justice


    3 credit hours

    This course introduces the sociological and criminological approach to understanding families. Connections between individual and society are explored in relation to the criminal justice system and what constitutes a “family.” It explores how our values influence and define norms, belief systems and how these systems serve to influence or help to prevent the involvement in the criminal justice system from the position of being a victim or an offender.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA every year
  
  • CRJ 340 Juvenile Justice


    3 credit hours

    This course will analyze the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency, along with the social administration of justice for juveniles. The legal rights and inter-relationship of juveniles with other institutions, including law enforcement, criminal courts, and placement alternatives, will be examined. We will examine and discuss contemporary juvenile media issues, changing public perceptions, violent crime, and public frustration, and the ensuing impact on juvenile delinquents and the system. Efforts will be made to give students a real life view of juvenile justice through discussion of actual cases, field trips, and visiting professionals.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI every Year
  
  • CRJ 341 Law Enforcement And Community Relations


    3 credit hours

    Law enforcement and police operations affect the democratic process more crucially than any other aspect of public policy. This course looks at the discretionary conduct of police, the development of police power and the degree to which the police officers perform their tasks in accordance with community values and needs. Other criminal justice systems reviewed and their effect on policing.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year 
  
  • CRJ 342 Criminology


    3 credit hours

    Criminology is the study of crime, its legal and social aspects. It is the purpose of the course to introduce to the student criminological theories, concepts and practices along with the sociological and psychological approach to criminal behavior.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 344 Probation, Parole, And Community Corrections


    3 credit hours

    This course will provide students with an overview of probation, parole, personnel, and agencies who monitor offenders. The student will discuss existing and evolving intensive supervision programs, pre-adjudicatory options, offender reentry and evaluate program effectiveness.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • CRJ 345 Special Needs Offenders In The Community


    3 credit hours

    This course will address both public safety and treatment issues for specialized offenders. Appropriate assessment and classification of offenders within treatment programs will be examined, along with issues of community supervision officers and health clinicians. The problems and issues of supervising and treating special needs offenders, alongside public safety, is examined.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 346 Drugs, Society And Criminal Justice


    3 credit hours

    This course is an introduction into the basic facts and major issues concerning drug-taking behavior as it relates to our culture and criminal activity, focusing on interrelationships between drugs and social order. The social history of legal and illegal drug use and the misuse and abuse of chemical substances are analyzed in detail with particular attention to issues related to drug-related crime, drug policy, treatment and the criminal justice system.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 395 Junior Seminar


    3 credit hours

    This course will prepare students for their senior presentations and research required their senior year in CRJ 495, along with preparation for professional life in various criminal justice fields. Journal articles covering a range of issues in criminal justice will be read and discussed. Research topics will be assigned for senior seminar. There will be a heavy emphasis on the research process, including writing literature review, and methodology. An additional focus will be on activities toward professional exploration and development.

    Prerequisite: Junior status
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 440 Criminal Law


    3 credit hours

    A detailed study of criminal law, its origin, definition, and scope. The role of the enforcement officer in the application of substantive criminal law. An analysis of the rights and duties of a police officer concerning particular types of crime.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 441 Courtroom Demeanor And Technique


    3 credit hours

    This course is designed to acquaint and educate the police officer and layperson alike in preparation for testifying in the open courtroom. It is based upon a survey of the general rules of evidence so that the student will be able to anticipate what will occur during a trial and what he or she should do in preparation for a trial.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year, and WI at Siena @ MCCC
  
  • CRJ 445 Contemporary Issues In Criminal Justice


    3 credit hours

    This course will examine and explore a number of emergent issues facing managers of the criminal justice system today. The interdisciplinary approach will explore and place emphasis on issues selected from, but not limited to, domestic violence and current cases directing criminal justice, sexual assault, drugs and societal responses, and law enforcement ethics.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year 
  
  • CRJ 480 Internship/Co-Op Work Experience


    3-12 credit hours

    This course encompasses 150 hours of field experience in various federal, state, local law enforcement and criminal justice agencies that is set-up and arranged by the student. The instructor will monitor progress and help direct and focus the student’s research. This is accomplished through regularly scheduled meetings with the advisor and peers who are also doing field experience. There is a final paper with specific guidelines and format due as a final requirement. Application should be made with and approval granted by the program director the session before enrolling in the instruction.

    Prerequisite: Permission
    Course is Offered: FA, WI and SU Every Year and offered at Siena at MCCC
  
  • CRJ 495 Senior Seminar


    3 credit hours

    A course designed for senior students majoring in Criminal Justice. The course is an examination of the critical issues in criminal justice as they relate to the police, courts, corrections, and the general population. Students will continue research topic from junior seminar, complete the research paper and present for University.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year 

Community and Human Services

  
  • CSV 320 Community And Human Service Systems


    3 credit hours

    This course provides an overview and an introduction to the community and human services field. Key theories and processes in the field will be identified and examined, with a particular emphasis on the role of the community service professional as an agent for positive social change. Topics include but are not limited to community agency awareness, investigative techniques, family systems, and community organization. The variety of career opportunities and various approaches to community and human services will also be examined.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus
  
  • CSV 344 Issues In Addiction: Drugs & Society


    3 credit hours

    Students will study the history and the various names, elements, uses, and effects of alcohol and other drugs, both legal and illegal. Treatment programs of addiction will be surveyed, including individual and group therapies. The student will become familiar with the various treatment facilities and options in his/her own community.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus
  
  • CSV 454 Youth Issues In Community And Human Services Practice


    3 credit hours

    Designed to develop the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity to work with young children and adolescents from a variety of backgrounds. Learning to work in a variety of settings including schools, residential and day treatment centers, juvenile detention and corrections facilities and neighborhoods will be included as will matching intervention methods and youths’ developmental stage and social-psychological needs.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus
  
  • CSV 460 Crisis Intervention


    3 credit hours

    This course deals with an examination of issues in crisis intervention. It will offer the student a model of how to recognize the symptoms of various life crises, responses, and interventions for the following real life issues: Suicide, Homicide and Psychotic Crises, Developmental Crises of the Life Cycle, Crises of Loss, Natural and Manmade Disasters, Crises of Personal Victimization such as physical and sexual abuse, Crises of Substance. This course prepares the student with skills necessary to work effectively in any number of crisis situations and settings, including crisis hotlines, pastoral work, community aid, hospitals, and school interventions.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus
  

Economics

  
  
  
  • ECO 342 Comparative Economic Systems


    3 credit hours

    A comparative analysis of the theories of individualistic economic systems, collectivist economic systems, and the many compromises between the two. Current practices of societies claiming these theoretical underpinnings will be examined. Historical development will be emphasized. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ECO 348 Money And Capital Markets


    3 credit hours

    Introduces students to financial systems in our global economy. Systems include the market roles of governments, central banks, businesses, consumers, financial intermediaries and capital sources. Students learn what determines capital costs, how to forecast rates, where to raise money and how to manage financial risks in money, fixed income, mortgage, venture capital and primary equity markets. Special emphasis is given to managing banks and nonbanks as well as evaluating and selecting their services. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ECO 350 International Finance


    3 credit hours

    This course explores global financial markets and the financial operations of a multinational firm. The first part of the course covers concepts related to the foreign exchange markets, currency derivative markets, global risk management, principles of hedging and arbitrage. The second part examines investment and financing decisions of a firm within the international environment. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ECO 460 Managerial Economics and Strategy


    3 credit hours

    A study of how microeconomic analysis and quantitative tools can be applied to aid managers in making sound business decisions. Topics include: demand and supply analysis, forecasting consumer demand,  production and cost analysis, game theory strategies about pricing, production, entry and innovation, agency and contract theory, behavioral economics, managerial decisions under uncertainty and asymmetric information, and governmental regulation.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ECO 485 Special Topics


    3 credit hours

    This course examines major microeconomic and macroeconomic issues such as unemployment, poverty, the minimum wage, energy, government regulation, the federal deficit, and international imbalances. Various viewpoints, including that of Catholic social teaching, will be considered. Note: Course offering cycles apply to the Adrian campus only.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain

Education

  
  • EDU 201 Principles Of Teaching In School And Society


    3 credit hours

    A course that involves beginning prospective teachers in the real issues of schooling and education - issues such as curriculum, methodology, politics, global perspectives, multicultural diversity, and State of Michigan certification requirements. Students will encounter many opportunities to reflect upon the teaching/learning process, develop tentative images of themselves as teachers, and experience the realities of elementary and secondary classrooms. There are opportunities for microteaching on video, individual and cooperative learning projects, attendance at school board meetings, and personal exploration of motives for teaching. Field experience in schools at all levels is required.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • EDU 211 Health And Movement Education


    3 credit hours

    Practical techniques and methods for teaching games and physical education activities at the elementary school level, investigation of material covered in various elementary health education programs. Classroom observation required. Required for elementary certification in Ohio and Illinois.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • EDU 301 Perspectives In American Education


    3 credit hours

    This course contrasts the history of the education of those in the American mainstream with the history of the education of those in eight micro-cultures: African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, Native Americans, women, those in special education (exceptionalities), the impact of religious education, and education as it differs by social class. Content covering the history of American education will also include: teacher unions and politics, integrating multiple intelligences and learning styles, classroom management strategies and trends, local, state, and national control of schools, and legal issues surrounding education. In addition, students consider how educational philosophies are lived out in elementary and secondary classrooms and how these philosophies have and do influence the education of the above micro-cultures.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • EDU 312 Exceptional Children and Youth in the Regular Classroom


    3 credit hours

    An overview of students’ diverse needs as represented in the regular classroom. Examines attitudes and adaptations to enhance instruction and the learning environment for children and youth with exceptional characteristics involving cognitive ability (learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, gifted and special talents), physical functioning, sensory modalities, and emotional and behavioral status. Also considers contemporary issues in education for students with exceptional needs in the least restrictive environment. Thirty (30) clock hours of field experience are required.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • EDU 321 Technology For Educators


    3 credit hours

    A course designed to help students acquire the “ability to use information technology to enhance learning and to enhance personal and professional productivity”. Topics include: the use of multimedia, telecommunications including the Internet and World Wide Web, instructional resource management, presentations, word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and desktop publishing packages. Students will be involved in developing projects that will help them to understand the importance of staying current, to appreciate the ethical, social, physical, and psychological issues concerning the use of information technology, to use information technology to enhance continuing professional development, and to acquire the skills and methodology necessary to effectively integrate technology across the curriculum.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year, SU 2019, SU 2021
  
  • EDU 322 Methods And Materials Of Early Childhood Education


    3 credit hours

    Examines current theory regarding the education of young children (pre-kindergarten and kindergarten), emphasis on the importance of an early enriched environment and critical periods for learning. Includes nine (9) hours of observation of children in a Montessori environment.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • EDU 349 Culture And Diversity In Schools


    3 credit hours

    Designed to provide students with opportunities to examine, participate in, and experience teaching in an urban area setting. Sixty (60) clock hours in either an urban elementary or secondary classroom are required. Supervision by urban classroom teachers will provide the students with many opportunities for teaching and evaluation. Requirements include keeping a journal, reading educational periodicals, using technology to both learn and present, interviewing teachers and students, and individual and group processing with university professors/supervisors.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year, SU 2018, SU 2020
  
  • EDU 351 Educational Psychology


    3 credit hours

    Study of theories of learning as they developed historically and their practical application to contemporary elementary, middle and high school classrooms. Includes consideration of motivation, individual differences, classroom management and evaluation, multicultural issues, developmentally appropriate curriculum, and dealing with exceptionalities. Students will keep a journal, engage in a variety of “searches” for information and research, participate in large and small group presentations, and participate in twenty (20) clock hours of classroom field work observing and putting theory into practice.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year, SU 2018, SU 2020
  
  • EDU 360 Education Practicum


    3 credit hours

    Supervised observation, participation, and teaching in a Lenawee County elementary school. A minimum of one hundred (100) clock hours is required. All students will be placed in classrooms matching their academic major/minor. In addition to the responsibilities necessary in assuming some of the teaching duties in the local schools, students will process their experiences orally in small group, seminar situations, and in writing through journals and written assignments.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • EDU 371 Elementary Core Education Methods


    4 credit hours

    Analysis and application of basic teacher competencies: using research-based practices, holding positive expectations for student success, being an extremely good classroom manager, designing lessons to help students reach mastery, assessing learning through authentic measures, meeting students differing learning styles, meeting diversity needs, teaching with and through the arts, and designing lessons which are developmentally appropriate, content specific, and use technology as an enhancement for the teaching/learning process. The culminating project is an extensive unit plan.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • EDU 372 Secondary Education Methods


    3 credit hours

    Identification and illustration of effective teaching techniques at the secondary level through microteaching, planning lessons and instructional units, and writing learning outcomes. Also considers classroom management, motivation, evaluation, textbook analysis, multicultural issues, and the needs of the exceptional students. Student texts include “Design Tools for the Internet-Supported Classroom”, “A Resource Guide for Secondary School Teaching”, and “Beyond Discipline: From Compliance to Community”.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • EDU 480 Student Teaching


    7-10 credit hours

    Supervised observation, participation, and full-time teaching in private and public K-12 schools in Lenawee County. This is a fourteen (14) week, full-time placement. University supervisors will observe and evaluate student teachers five (5) times during this session. Evaluation criteria is based upon the Michigan Department of Education Entry-Level Standards for Teachers. Credit/No Credit grading only.

    Prerequisite: Permission 
    Corequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • EDU 495 Student Teaching Seminar


    2 credit hours

    Group discussions and analysis of problems and challenges encountered during student teaching, speakers on relevant issues, and videotaped simulated employment interviews. Requirements include keeping a journal, establishing a credential file and professional portfolio, and participating in an oral comprehensive interview based on the teacher education program learning outcomes.

    Prerequisite: Permission
    Corequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year

English

  
  • ENG 099 College Reading


    3 credit hours

    This course is designed to improve basic reading skills and reading comprehension. This course will emphasize building comprehension skills, identifying the main ideas and supporting details, improving factual recall, recognizing context clues, making inferences, and drawing conclusions. Vocabulary improvement will also be stressed.

    Prerequisite: Placement
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENG 100 Basic Writing


    3 credit hours

    The course focuses on the development of basic, sentence-level writing skills, especially grammar and mechanics, and the composition of unified, developed paragraphs. Students will draft and revise multiple paragraphs and at least one full essay.

    Prerequisite: Placement
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 101 Reading And Writing I


    3 credit hours

    This class focuses conventions of academic essay writing through a variety of rhetorical modes. The student will engage in and develop strong habits of pre-writing, drafting, revision, and editing. Students will be introduced to critical thinking and writing across the curriculum.

    Prerequisite: “C” or better in ENG 100 Basic Writing , or Placement
    Liberal Arts: English Composition (College for Professional Studies)
    Course is Offered: FA, WI, and SU Every Year
  
  • ENG 102 Reading And Writing II


    3 credit hours

    Students will read and discuss a variety of essays. Students will write essays some of which will require summary and critique and the incorporation, synthesis, and documentation of multiple sources. CAS Students will be expected to write a properly cited research paper and demonstrate capacity for writing across the curriculum and critical thinking.

    Prerequisite: “C” or better in ENG 101 Reading And Writing I  or Placement
    Liberal Arts: English Composition. A grade of 2.0 or greater is required in this course. 
    Course is Offered: FA, WI, and SU Every Year
  
  • ENG 113 Introduction To Literature


    3 credit hours

    Study of literature as an art form focusing on the genres of fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will do close readings of stories, poems, and plays to understand how literary elements create value in a work. Students will write short papers of definition and analysis, engage in classroom discussion, and make oral presentations. Required for all majors and minors; especially useful to students interested in the other arts.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 150 Introduction To Creative Writing


    3 credit hours

    This course will introduce students to the craft and art of Creative Writing. Students will learn the principles and techniques of a range of creative styles, including poetry and fiction. Students will read and analyze a range of poems and short stories, studying various genres and artistic movements. Students will produce their own poems and short stories which will be read by the rest of the class and discussed during workshops. Previous writing experience is welcomed but not required.

    Prerequisite:
    Liberal Arts: Fine/Performing Arts
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 211 Rhetoric


    3 credit hours

    Introduction to the history and theories of rhetoric, including the study of oral, written, and visual rhetorics, and practice in effective and ethical means of persuasion.

    Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in ENG 102 Reading And Writing II   
    Liberal Arts: English Composition
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 212 Research


    3 credit hours

    Practice in research methods, outlining, and expository prose. The student will write several short and one long (15-18 pp.) documented papers.

    Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in ENG 102 Reading And Writing II  or placement
    Liberal Arts: English Composition
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ENG 221 English Grammar


    3 credit hours

    The study of rules that govern the structure of the English language, including parts of speech and other grammatical conventions. Students will also examine syntax, that is, how words are put together to form phrases, clauses, and sentences. Intended primarily for students in Teacher Education.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA, WI, and SU Every Year
  
  • ENG 225 Introduction To Children’s Literature


    3 credit hours

    This course explores the history of attitudes toward children and the history and theory of children’s literature. It also explores folk tales and myths, poetry, realistic fiction, science fiction, fantasy, and picture books. The course covers literature for children from pre-school through grade 6.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENG 226 Adolescent Literature


    3 credit hours

    This course covers theory and examples of classic and contemporary fiction and non-fiction for children from grades 6-12. The course includes attention to the field of adolescent fiction and to current issues in the field of children’s literature.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 240 Introduction To Journalism


    3 credit hours

    This course introduces students to the basic theory, analysis, and practice of journalism. Through criticism of news media texts, discussions of trends in journalism, and the production of news stories, students will develop critical media literacy and writing skills.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENG 242 Spectra


    1 credit hours

    This is a course in which students will have direct experience in the techniques of news and feature writing through participation in Spectra, the student news organization. The course is offered as needed and may be taken up to three times.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 251 World Literature I: From Oral Traditions To 1700


    3 credit hours

    This course explores the mythologies and oral traditions of various world cultures including Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas; and the development of those traditions into written literatures in the centuries leading up to 1700. A major emphasis of the course is on the transformation to written literature and the development of literary traditions. This class will include a balance of European texts and non-European texts.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Odd Year
  
  • ENG 260 Approaches To Literary Criticism


    3 credit hours

    This course introduces literary criticism as a formal study. It surveys major critical approaches, including Reader- Response, Deconstructive, Feminist, Psychological, Historical and New-Historical, Cultural, and New Criticism. Students will write several short essays, each employing a different critical approach, and one long research paper using a variety of analytical perspectives.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENG 270 Introductory Poetry Workshop


    3 credit hours

    This course introduces students to the craft of poetry. Students will learn basic forms and techniques, will produce multiple poems, and will participate in workshops. Students will produce their own poems which will be read by the rest of the class and discussed during workshops.

    Prerequisite:
    Liberal Arts: Fine/Performing Arts
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 271 Introductory Fiction Workshop


    3 credit hours

    This course introduces students to the craft of fiction. Students will learn basic forms and techniques, will produce multiple stories, and will participate in workshops. Students will produce their own short stories which will be read by the rest of the class and discussed during workshops.

    Prerequisite:
    Liberal Arts: Fine/Performing Arts
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 272 Introduction To Editing A Literary Journal: Eclipse


    2 credit hours

    In this course, students are introduced to the process of editing a literary journal. Students will assist in soliciting, selecting, editing, and producing materials for Eclipse, Siena’s annual literary magazine published every Fall session. The content may include all genres of literature and fine arts. The staff designs the magazine, which includes layout, advertising, and plans for distribution.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ENG 273 Introduction To Publishing A Literary Journal: Eclipse


    1 credit hours

    In this course, students are introduced to the production components of Siena’s annual literary magazine published every Fall session. Students will assist in working with a professional graphic designer and publisher, who advise the process. Students assist in finalizing the layout, printing, advertising, and selling of the magazine. As it takes a full year to produce Eclipse, ENG 273 may be taken as a continuation of ENG 272 Introduction To Editing A Literary Journal: Eclipse , or as a new course.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 340 Advanced Poetry Workshop


    3 credit hours

    Extensive practice in the writing of poetry, traditional and experimental, with attention to the language, style, and point of view essential to the needs of the form. The students will read and analyze the poetry of established writers, participate in critiquing work produced by the class, and over the course of the workshop, develop critical judgment. Students will produce their own poems which will be read by the rest of the class and discussed during workshops.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Odd Year
  
  • ENG 341 Advanced Expository Writing


    3 credit hours

    Extensive practice in the writing of short and extended, formal and informal essays and papers appropriate to different audiences and occasions. The student will read and analyze expository pieces in a variety of styles by contemporary authors, read parts of his/her own work aloud to fellow students, and develop critical competencies and advanced writing skills.

    Prerequisite:
    Liberal Arts: English Composition
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus.
  
  • ENG 342 Advanced Fiction Workshop


    3 credit hours

    Extensive practice in the writing of fiction, traditional and experimental, with attention to the language, style, and point of view essential to the needs of the form. The students will read and analyze the fiction of established writers, participate in critiquing work produced by the class, and over the course of the workshop, develop critical judgment. Students will produce their own short stories which will be read by the rest of the class and discussed during workshops.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ENG 343 British Literary History I


    3 credit hours

    Survey of major literary and linguistic movements in the British Isles from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. May focus on historical, social, religious, and cultural contexts of literary production.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Odd Year
  
  • ENG 344 Scriptwriting


    3 credit hours

    Extensive practice in the writing of plays and film/video scripts, traditional and experimental, with attention to the language, style, and point of view essential to the needs of the form. The students will read and analyze the scripts of established writers, participate in critiquing work produced by the class, and over the course of the workshop, develop critical judgment.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA 2019
 

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