Mar 03, 2024  
2021 Siena Heights University Catalog 
    
2021 Siena Heights University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Click here for further course code explanations and definitions; including The College of Professional Studies course delivery options.

  

 

Computer Information Systems

  
  • CIS 375 Network Forensics


    3 credit hours

    The intent of Network Forensics is to provide students with the ability apply forensics techniques to investigate and analyze network traffic.

    Prerequisite: CIS 210 Introduction to Networks  
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • CIS 420 Policy, Legal, Ethics, and Compliance


    3 credit hours

    The intent of Policy, Legal, Ethics, and Compliance is to provide students with and understanding of information assurance in context and the rules and guidelines that control them.

    Prerequisite: CIS 203 Principles of Cybersecurity  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CIS 443 Data Communications


    3 credit hours

    This course will provide the student with a working understanding of the rapidly expanding field of data communications. Fundamentals of data communications concepts, including basic hardware requirements, network configurations, and software protocols are discussed. Microcomputer software is used as a tool to aid in the design and management of a data communications network.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • CIS 450 Programming Languages


    3 credit hours

    This course is a comparative study of programming languages and their features. The aim is to develop understanding of the organization of programming languages while enhancing problem solving skills and programming skills. It will provide a survey of various programming languages including C++, MATLAB, Python, and Visual Basic.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA 2018
  
  
  • CIS 455 Computer Hardware And Software


    3 credit hours

    The course provides hands-on training to support and maintain a Personal Computer (PC). Students will learn how to install, configure, administer, and manage the necessary hardware and software that are associated with a PC. Some of the topics covered are: installation of hard disk, floppy drive, power supply, I/O devices, and Windows operating system. Students will get an opportunity to troubleshoot a variety of hardware and software problems. The operation and the management of a help desk facility will also be covered in this class.

    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • CIS 460 Web Development


    3 credit hours

    This course will focus on the design and development of Web pages through the use of life cycle methodology. Students apply their skill in the creation of web pages using text, graphics, tables, frames, and forms. Tools like HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), Java, CGI (Common Gateway Interface), JavaScripts, and ActiveX Controls will be used throughout the course.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA 2018
  
  • CIS 461 Secure Programming Practices


    3 credit hours

    The intent of Secure Programming Practices is to provide students with an understanding of the characteristics of secure programs and the ability to implement programs that are free from vulnerabilities.

    Prerequisite: CIS 120 Introduction to Programming  and CIS 352 Data Structures  
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • CIS 465 Management Information Systems


    3 credit hours

    An in-depth study of the problems in managing computer based information systems. The course focuses on the definition, evaluation, installation, and continuing management of EDP systems. Issues of planning and control as well as the organizational impact of computer systems will be stressed.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • CIS 467 Web Application Security


    3 credit hours

    The intent of Web Application Security is to provide students with an understanding of technology, tools, and practices associated with web applications.

    Prerequisite: CIS 120 Introduction to Programming  and CIS 352 Data Structures  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CIS 470 Data And Network Assurance


    3 credit hours

    This course provides an in-depth study of the various technical and administrative aspects of Information and Network Security and Assurance. This course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Students will be exposed to the spectrum of Security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • CIS 471 Vulnerability Analysis


    3 credit hours

    The intent of Vulnerability Analysis is to provide students with a thorough understanding of system vulnerabilities, to include what they are, how they can be found/identified, the different types of vulnerabilities, how to determine the root cause of a vulnerability, and how to mitigate their effect on an operational system.

    Prerequisite: CIS 203 Principles of Cybersecurity  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CIS 472 Numerical Analysis


    3 credit hours

    The sources of computational error will be studied. The student will solve problems by numerical techniques. Topics include: solutions of differential equations unsolvable by traditional methods, interpolation, approximation methods, and integration techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • CIS 480 Co-Op Work Experience


    1-12 credit hours

    See program coordinator for work experience opportunities within the Computer and Information Systems field.

    Prerequisite: Permission
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • CIS 485 Special Topics


    1-3 credit hours

    The study of selected topics of emerging technologies not ordinarily covered in-depth in other courses. Special topics may be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. No more than three credit hours may apply to CIS major or CIS minor.

    Prerequisite: CIS 203 Principles of Cybersecurity  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CIS 485A Special Topics


    3 credit hours

    The intent of Special Topics is to provide credit for courses that address emerging issues related to Information Assurance and Cyber Defense. This can only be used for one mapped course and must adequately provide evidence of Cyber Defense topics addressed.

    Prerequisite: CIS 203 Principles of Cybersecurity  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CIS 495 Senior Project/Seminar


    3 credit hours

    Students will develop a computer system integrating previous courses. The system will be documented and an oral presentation given. Programs may be written or software packages employed for the project. Students must also attend professional seminars and attend and perform other career-related activities.

    Prerequisite: Permission
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year

Clinical Mental Health Counseling

  
  • CMH 602 Research And Professional Writing In Counseling


    3 credit hours

    Required of all counseling students, except in situations when a previous research course, at the graduate level, is accepted for transfer from another University. Examines the role of research in developing the counseling profession, including how to critique research to substantiate best practice in clinical mental health counseling. Overviews basic statistical methods utilized in research and examines quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method designs. Discusses design and analysis of needs assessment, program evaluation, and counseling outcome measures. Reviews ethical standards related to research in counseling. Explores culturally-sensitive strategies for designing, implementing, interpreting, and reporting the results of research, program evaluation, and counseling outcome measurement.

  
  • CMH 620 Foundations Of Clinical Mental Health Counseling


    3 credit hours

    A survey course designed to present the history, philosophy, core values and trends in the counseling profession and, specifically, in clinical mental health counseling. Explores counselor roles, functions and relationships with other human service providers, including those related to advocacy, social justice, outreach and emergency response. Discusses differences between prevention and intervention. Examines mental health delivery and managed care systems. Overviews credentialing, licensure and professional organizations pertinent to counseling specialties, including mental health counseling. Explores the expanding role of technology, including social networking, in counseling.

  
  • CMH 623 Psychology Over The Lifespan


    3 credit hours

    Explores a variety of perspectives on individual and family development including: cognitive, psychodynamic, existential, systems and neurobiological. Surveys personality theory. Explores situational and environmental factors that affect development, including transitional crises and trauma. Explores theories for facilitating optimal development and resilience across the lifespan. Explores the impact of exceptionality and disability on human development.

  
  • CMH 626 Relationship-Building In Counseling


    3 credit hours

    This competency-based laboratory course, focuses on acquiring and developing counseling skills fundamental to the relationship-building and exploratory phases of the counseling process. Students explore the impact of counselor characteristics and behaviors on the counseling process. Students engage in reflective activities designed to strengthen counselor resilience, to heighten awareness of personal values and to enhance appreciation of client strengths and potentials.

    Prerequisite: Prerequisites: CMH 620 Foundations Of Clinical Mental Health Counseling  and CMH 623 Psychology Over The Lifespan  
  
  • CMH 629 Counseling Theories And Procedures


    3 credit hours

    A survey of major counseling theories: historical, contemporary and emergent. This course is designed to help students appreciate the theoretical grounding and research behind various counseling techniques and procedures and to help them begin to develop an integrated personal theory of counseling. Discusses the use of research to inform evidence-based practice.

  
  • CMH 632 Ethics And Legal Issues In Counseling


    3 credit hours

    This course addresses the wide array of ethical and legal issues faced by contemporary counselors. Students will become familiar with the codes of ethics of the American Counseling Association and the Association of Clinical Mental Health Counselors. They will learn frameworks for making ethical decisions and will apply an understanding of ethical and legal issues to case scenarios. Students will become familiar with both HIPPA and FERPA, as well as with legislation and case law related to counseling in Michigan. They will explore the developing body of work on ethics for counselors in the digital age.

    Prerequisite: CMH 620 Foundations Of Clinical Mental Health Counseling  and CMH 626 Relationship-Building In Counseling  
  
  • CMH 635 Group Procedures In Counseling


    3 credit hours

    An applied approach to counseling with groups, in this course experiential and laboratory methods are utilized to develop group skills. Participants learn about group theories, group processes and dynamics, and about facilitation styles. Methods of evaluating group effectiveness are covered.

  
  • CMH 638 Counseling Diverse Populations


    3 credit hours

    Designed to explore theories, models and research related to identity development in a diverse world and to multicultural counseling. Incorporate experiential activities to foster understanding of self and culturally diverse clients. Explores the counselor’s role in social justice and advocacy for diverse populations. Explores counselor’s role in eliminating bias, prejudice, oppression and discrimination. A grade of “B” or better required to continue in program.

  
  • CMH 641 Career Development


    3 credit hours

    This course addresses 1) the history and future of career counseling in a diverse, global economy, 2) career development theories, 3) measurement instruments and processes for work-related preferences, abilities, and special needs, 4) career information databases related to job market and labor trends, 5) skills related to career decision making and planning across the lifespan, 6) contemporary work-life balance issues, 7) career counseling processes and 8) the development and administration of career guidance programs.

    Prerequisite: None
  
  
  • CMH 647 Psychopathology And Resilience


    3 credit hours

    Explores definitions of and continuum between mental health and mental illness. Explores manifestations of abnormal behavior, including organic conditions and personality problems in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age. Considers data from commonly utilized personality measurements. Explores models, both traditional and strengths-based, for promoting wellness and resilience across the continuum of mental health and mental illness among individuals, families, and communities.

    Prerequisite:
  
  • CMH 651 Diagnosis For Counselors


    3 credit hours

    Utilizing theoretical and case study approaches, this course studies the evolution and application of the DSM and ICD in clinical practice, with a particular emphasis on the shifting understanding of diagnosis represented in the DSM-5. Explores the benefits of and limitations to utilizing the DMS-5. Develops a framework for recognizing and identifying symptoms and dynamics of mental and emotional disorders. Explores the differences between diagnosable disorders and developmentally appropriate reactions during crises, disasters, and events perceived as traumatic. Examines the multicultural implications of using common diagnostic tools.  

    Prerequisite:
  
  • CMH 652 Psychopharmacology For Counselors


    3 credit hours

    Examines the biological mechanisms of psychopharmacological interventions for the treatment of mental and emotional disorders. Explores the history of psychopharmacological interventions. Overviews basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly-prescribed medications for specific disorders. Discusses common side-effects and drug-drug interactions for psychopharmacological agents. Explores the role of the counselor in referring for medication evaluations and in collaborating with prescribing providers.

  
  
  
  
  • CMH 660 Understanding Addiction


    3 credit hours

    Introduction to understanding addiction, in particular through a multi-faceted lens including biological, psychological, sociological, and environmental perspectives.
    Basic pharmacology of both illicit and psychotherapeutic drugs will be included. Covers information about drugs and alcohol, including history, categories, definitions, misuse, abuse, attitudes, personality, and reasons for adolescent and adult use. Students will learn the cycle of addiction model, including understanding how the many ways in which this cycle can be interrupted provide a (rational) basis for hope in recovery.

  
  • CMH 665 Consulting Theory And Practice


    1 credit hours

    An examination of the theories and procedures of consulting and the change process. Introduces consultation as a concept used to inspire conceptual thinking for helping individuals, groups, and organizations function more effectively and efficiently. Explores effective program evaluation and needs assessment strategies.  

  
  
  
  • CMH 678 Relationship And Sexuality Counseling


    2 credit hours

    Overviews contemporary theories and practices related to counseling relationships, including ethnicity and gender issues in assessment and treatment. Surveys common sexuality concerns and disorders encountered when treating couples. The course is designed to increase trainees’ comfort level in assessing and treating relationship issues, including sexuality. Students uncomfortable with explicit discussion of sexual issues, attitudes, behaviors and practices should consider whether participation in this course is appropriate for them.

  
  
  • CMH 683 Counseling Internship 1 / Conceptualization


    3 credit hours

    The Counseling Internship is an individualized, on-the-job, intensive counseling experience requiring 600 clock hours with 240 hours of direct client contact under professional supervision. The Internship provides the counselor trainee an opportunity to perform all activities expected of a regularly employed counselor in a clinical or school setting. The Internship experience (Seminars 1 and 2) spans two (2) semesters (approximately 33-34 weeks), allowing the counselor trainee sufficient time to develop entry level practitioner skills. Internship 1 is a regularly scheduled campus seminar focusing on processing the internship experience. The didactic segment of Internship 1 will assist students with conceptualizing client cases, developing service plans, providing treatment, and assessing outcomes. Attendance is mandatory.

    Prerequisite: A grade of “B” or better in CMH 680 Counseling Field Practicum , and approval of Counselor Education Program Director. Application required. Final presentation of portfolio required. A grade of “B” or better required to continue in program.
  
  • CMH 684 Counseling Internship 2 / NCE Preparation


    3 credit hours

    During the Internship 2 seminar, students continue to accrue hours in fulfillment of the required 600 clock hours with 240 direct hours of direct client contact under professional supervision. Students will continue to process client cases and their internship experience. The didactic segment of Internship 2 will focus on preparing students to take and pass the National Counseling Examination. Final presentation of portfolio required. A grade of “B” or better required to complete program.

  
  • CMH 685 Internship Extender Seminar


    1 credit hours

    Intended only for students who do not complete field hours during Counseling Internship 1 and 2, the Extender Seminar provides independent, but regular, contact with faculty until all internship requirements are completed. Faculty continue to provide liaison with field placement site personnel. Course may be repeated two times.

  

Communications

  
  • COM 111 Introduction To Communications


    3 credit hours

    This course introduces the history and foundational concepts and theories of the study of human communication. With an emphasis on critical analysis, students will examine the social and cultural implications of communication, from interpersonal communication to mass media. Students will also develop their public speaking skills through oral presentations and projects. 

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • COM 245 Communications Theory


    3 credit hours

    This course examines in detail a variety of different approaches to the study of human communication. Through the close study of individual communications theories, written assignments, and presentations, students learn to analyze a variety of types of communication (interpersonal, group, organizational, rhetoric, media, intercultural, etc.) through the application of theory to their everyday lives and experiences. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Odd Year
  
  • COM 285 Special Topics


    3 credit hours

    A close examination on a particular theme, topic, or current event related to the study of human communications, to be determined by the instructor teaching the course that session. Students will read, analyze, and research topics related to the course theme, with the goal of productive conversation an a better understanding of the diverse field of Communications. 

    Prerequisite: Based on course topic. 
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
    Repeatable: This course is repeatable.
  
  • COM 340 Intercultural Communication


    3 credit hours

    This course explores the study of communication and interaction within and across a variety of cultures, from the interpersonal level to the global level. Emphasis is on the ways in which globalization, politics, and current events impact the ways individuals and cultures communicate. Through discussion and assignments, students will learn to analyze the challenges of intercultural communication and develop/apply solutions for effective communication in their future careers and everyday lives. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Even Year
  
  • COM 352 History Of The Mass Media


    3 credit hours

    This course explores the history and development of mass media, examining  a variety of forms: print, film radio, television, Internet, etc. The emphasis is on understanding and analyzing the social, cultural, economic, ethical, and political implications of these media forms as they both respond to and impact shifts in culture and society. 

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Even Year
  
  
  • COM 480 Internship


    3 credit hours

    The internship is offered to give students practical experience in specialized areas of communication, such as journalism, public relations, advertising, editing, publishing, and media. Duties, workload, goals, and assessment will be arranged by the academic advisor and internship provider in consultation with the student.

    Prerequisite: Permission
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • COM 485 Special Topics


    3 credit hours

    A close examination on a particular theme, topic, or current event related to the study of human communications, to be determined by the instructor teaching the course that semester. Students will read, analyze, and research topics related to the course theme, with the goal of productive conversation and a well-researched and analyzed project/paper/presentation. 

    Prerequisite: Based on course topic. 
    Course is Offered: Uncertain
    Repeatable: This course is repeatable.
  
  • COM 495 Senior Tutorial


    3 credit hours

    Intensive experience in research related to senior Communication majors’ cumulative paper/project. Individually designed by faculty and student in collaboration with the department.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRJ 101 Introduction To Criminal Justice


    3 credit hours

    A survey of the philosophical and historical trends that make up the criminal justice system. Also included is an evaluation of the criminal justice system including: current trends, career orientation, agencies and processes.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 140 Introduction To Corrections


    3 credit hours

    This course will present a historical review of correctional and penal institutions as well as the current state of achievement. It will also stress the needs and directions for future efforts.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA and WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 240 Report Writing For The Criminal Justice Professional


    3 credit hours

    This course will provide students specific advice, writing examples, and guidelines for law enforcement, corrections, probation and parole. Detailed examples and practice will be used to demonstrate to students how to write for maximum documentation that will hold up in court, utilizing grammar, mechanics, various speakers, and modernization methods.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 241 Criminal Justice, Fact And Fiction


    3 credit hours

    This course will be taught at the Gus Harrison Correctional Facility. Ten students per session from SHU will learn with inmates in an inside/outside learning environment. The class focus will be the Criminal Justice systems (law enforcement, corrections, courts), through fiction and non-fiction sources. All university policies and rules will apply along with Gus Harrison policies.

    Prerequisite: Junior Status and permission
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 242 Families And Criminal Justice


    3 credit hours

    This course introduces the sociological and criminological approach to understanding families. Connections between individual and society are explored in relation to the criminal justice system and what constitutes a “family.” It explores how our values influence and define norms, belief systems and how these systems serve to influence or help to prevent the involvement in the criminal justice system from the position of being a victim or an offender.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Odd Years
  
  • CRJ 340 Juvenile Justice


    3 credit hours

    This course will analyze the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency, along with the social administration of justice for juveniles. The legal rights and inter-relationship of juveniles with other institutions, including law enforcement, criminal courts, and placement alternatives, will be examined. We will examine and discuss contemporary juvenile media issues, changing public perceptions, violent crime, and public frustration, and the ensuing impact on juvenile delinquents and the system. Efforts will be made to give students a real life view of juvenile justice through discussion of actual cases, field trips, and visiting professionals.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI every Year
  
  • CRJ 341 Law Enforcement And Community Relations


    3 credit hours

    Law enforcement and police operations affect the democratic process more crucially than any other aspect of public policy. This course looks at the discretionary conduct of police, the development of police power and the degree to which the police officers perform their tasks in accordance with community values and needs. Other criminal justice systems reviewed and their effect on policing.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year 
  
  • CRJ 342 Criminology


    3 credit hours

    Criminology is the study of crime, its legal and social aspects. It is the purpose of the course to introduce to the student criminological theories, concepts and practices along with the sociological and psychological approach to criminal behavior.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  
  • CRJ 345 Special Needs Offenders In The Community


    3 credit hours

    This course will address both public safety and treatment issues for specialized offenders. Appropriate assessment and classification of offenders within treatment programs will be examined, along with issues of community supervision officers and health clinicians. The problems and issues of supervising and treating special needs offenders, alongside public safety, is examined.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 346 Drugs, Society And Criminal Justice


    3 credit hours

    This course is an introduction into the basic facts and major issues concerning drug-taking behavior as it relates to our culture and criminal activity, focusing on interrelationships between drugs and social order. The social history of legal and illegal drug use and the misuse and abuse of chemical substances are analyzed in detail with particular attention to issues related to drug-related crime, drug policy, treatment and the criminal justice system.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 395 Junior Seminar


    3 credit hours

    This course will prepare students for their senior presentations and research required their senior year in CRJ 495, along with preparation for professional life in various criminal justice fields. Journal articles covering a range of issues in criminal justice will be read and discussed. Research topics will be assigned for senior seminar. There will be a heavy emphasis on the research process, including writing literature review, and methodology. An additional focus will be on activities toward professional exploration and development.

    Prerequisite: Junior status
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year, taken Senior year.
  
  • CRJ 440 Criminal Law


    3 credit hours

    A detailed study of criminal law, its origin, definition, and scope. The role of the enforcement officer in the application of substantive criminal law. An analysis of the rights and duties of a police officer concerning particular types of crime.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA  Every Year
  
  • CRJ 441 Courtroom Demeanor And Technique


    3 credit hours

    This course is designed to acquaint and educate the police officer and layperson alike in preparation for testifying in the open courtroom. It is based upon a survey of the general rules of evidence so that the student will be able to anticipate what will occur during a trial and what he or she should do in preparation for a trial.

    Prerequisite: CRJ 340 Juvenile Justice  or CRJ 342 Criminology    
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • CRJ 445 Contemporary Issues In Criminal Justice


    3 credit hours

    This course will examine and explore a number of emergent issues facing managers of the criminal justice system today. The interdisciplinary approach will explore and place emphasis on issues selected from, but not limited to, domestic violence and current cases directing criminal justice, sexual assault, drugs and societal responses, and law enforcement ethics.

    Prerequisite: CRJ 340 Juvenile Justice   or CRJ 342 Criminology  
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year 
  
  • CRJ 480 Internship/Co-Op Work Experience


    3-12 credit hours

    This course encompasses 150 hours of field experience in various federal, state, local law enforcement and criminal justice agencies that is set-up and arranged by the student. The instructor will monitor progress and help direct and focus the student’s research. This is accomplished through regularly scheduled meetings with the advisor and peers who are also doing field experience. There is a final paper with specific guidelines and format due as a final requirement. Application should be made with and approval granted by the program director the session before enrolling in the instruction.

    Prerequisite: Permission
    Course is Offered: WI and SU Every Year and offered at Siena at MCCC
  
  • CRJ 495 Senior Seminar


    3 credit hours

    A course designed for senior students majoring in Criminal Justice. The course is an examination of the critical issues in criminal justice as they relate to the police, courts, corrections, and the general population. Students will continue research topic from junior seminar, complete the research paper and present for University.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered:  \WI Every Year, taken Senior year.

Community and Human Services

  
  • CSV 320 Community And Human Service Systems


    3 credit hours

    This course provides an overview and an introduction to the community and human services field. Key theories and processes in the field will be identified and examined, with a particular emphasis on the role of the community service professional as an agent for positive social change. Topics include but are not limited to community agency awareness, investigative techniques, family systems, and community organization. The variety of career opportunities and various approaches to community and human services will also be examined.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus
  
  • CSV 344 Issues In Addiction: Drugs & Society


    3 credit hours

    Students will study the history and the various names, elements, uses, and effects of alcohol and other drugs, both legal and illegal. Treatment programs of addiction will be surveyed, including individual and group therapies. The student will become familiar with the various treatment facilities and options in his/her own community.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus
  
  • CSV 454 Youth Issues In Community And Human Services Practice


    3 credit hours

    Designed to develop the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity to work with young children and adolescents from a variety of backgrounds. Learning to work in a variety of settings including schools, residential and day treatment centers, juvenile detention and corrections facilities and neighborhoods will be included as will matching intervention methods and youths’ developmental stage and social-psychological needs.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus
  
  • CSV 460 Crisis Intervention


    3 credit hours

    This course deals with an examination of issues in crisis intervention. It will offer the student a model of how to recognize the symptoms of various life crises, responses, and interventions for the following real life issues: Suicide, Homicide and Psychotic Crises, Developmental Crises of the Life Cycle, Crises of Loss, Natural and Manmade Disasters, Crises of Personal Victimization such as physical and sexual abuse, Crises of Substance. This course prepares the student with skills necessary to work effectively in any number of crisis situations and settings, including crisis hotlines, pastoral work, community aid, hospitals, and school interventions.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: At one or more Siena Heights degree completion centers, but may not be available on the Adrian campus
  

Early Childhood Education

  
  • ECE 101 CDA Safe, Healthy, Learning Environments


    3 credit hours

    This course focuses on Competency Standard I related to establishing and maintaining a safe, healthy learning environment. The functional areas within this standard address practices to promote safe environments, healthy settings, and organization of the physical space/schedule that promotes engagement play, exploration and learning of all children. Functional areas address standards related to infant/toddler, preschool and family child care settings. ECE 101, ECE 102  and ECE 103  are courses required for the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. CDA candidates may apply these courses as general electives to a Child Development Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. These courses are not intended to fulfill general elective degree requirements for non-CDA candidates.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 102 CDA Supporting Domain Development


    3 credit hours

    This course focuses on Competency Standards II and III related to developmentally appropriate practices to support physical, intellectual, social and emotional development of young children. The functional areas within these standards address practices to promote physical, cognitive, communication, creative, self, and social skills. Functional areas address standards related to infant/toddler, preschool and family child care settings. ECE 101 , CDV 102 and ECE 103  are courses required for the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. CDA candidates may apply these courses as general electives to a Child Development Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. These courses are not intended to fulfill general elective degree requirements for non-CDA candidates.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ECE 103 CDA Parent, Partnership Development


    3 credit hours

    This course focuses on Competency Standards IV, V and VI related to effective program management, family partnerships and professionalism. The functional areas within these standards address program administrative practices, positive/productive relationships with families and the importance of a commitment to professionalism. Functional areas address standards related to infant/toddler, preschool and family child care settings. ECE 101 , ECE 102  and CDV 103 are courses required for the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. CDA candidates may apply these courses as general electives to a Child Development Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. These courses are not intended to fulfill general elective degree requirements for non-CDA candidates.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: SU Every Year
  
  • ECE 114 Child Growth and Development


    3 credit hours

    Child Growth and Development is taken first semester, freshman year, as foundational course. This course provides a general overview of the physical, social, emotional, language and cognitive development of the child from conception to age 8. It examines the environmental, ethnic, and familial factors that make for group differences and individuality of growth, and reviews current research in these areas. Candidates will explore typical verses atypical development of children and implications it has on educational, social, cognitive, and moral experiences.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 115 Child Growth and Development


    3 credit hours

    This basic survey course deals with the child from conception to adolescence. The student will be able to identify developmental psychological research strategies and theories; to distinguish genetic and prenatal stages; to compare and analyze the physical, social, emotional, and mental maturation from infancy to early adolescence including children with multicultural or special needs. In parenthood, education emphasis is placed on the influence of positive self-esteem in the family. Twenty-five hours of child interaction required.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 140 Freshman Seminar I


    1 credit hours

    Candidates will explore professionalism and ethics as they relate to the profession of early childhood education. Candidates will be exposed to the early childhood pathway expectations and requirements of the division of education to include, but limited to professional dispositions, clinical field experiences, building positive reciprocal professional relationships and becoming a member of a professional early childhood education community as they expand their knowledge, skill and dispositions. Candidates will explore and use technology as a teaching and learning tool. Candidates will begin to build a professional portfolio and philosophy of education.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 160 Infant and Toddler Curriculum


    3 credit hours

    This course is an introduction to sequential development of the infant and toddler child from birth to 3 years. Candidates will explore growth and development, design a safe environment, and plan appropriate learning activities. Specific topics will include theories of typical and atypical development, behaviors, well-being, basic care routines, curriculum and parent/caregiver relationships.

    Prerequisite: ECE 114 Child Growth and Development   
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 165 Infant Toddler Curriculum


    3 credit hours

    This course is an introduction to sequential development of the infant toddler child from birth to 3 years. Students will study and electronically research growth and development, design a safe environment, and plan appropriate learning activities. Special topics will include theories of infant development, infant/toddler behaviors, well-being/basic care routines, programming/curriculum and parent/caregiver relationships. Six hours of infant/toddler observations required.

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: WI 2019, WI 2021
  
  • ECE 170 Methods and Materials for Young Children


    3 credit hours

    This course examines current theory regarding the education of young children as it relates to the creation and evaluation of curriculum, instructional units, and activities that are developmentally appropriate for young children. Curricular integration to support physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive, spiritual and aesthetic development of young children in educational settings will be an overarching theme in this course.

    Prerequisite:  ECE 114 Child Growth and Development  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ECE 200 Creative Play and Human Development


    3 credit hours

    This course will present a comprehensive rational for placing play at the center of a balanced curriculum and intervention planning. The phenomena of children’s play and its relationships to development and therapeutic processes will be examined. Definitions, perspectives, theories and their implications for classroom and clinical practices in early childhood will be considered. Observations and analyses of live play episodes through field work will be conducted by candidates. This course is Ideal for those who want to engage children in a developmental zone where children and professionals are learning from and with each other.

    Prerequisite: ECE 160 Infant and Toddler Curriculum  and ECE 170 Methods and Materials for Young Children  
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 210 Child Guidance & Management


    3 credit hours

    This comprehensive course focuses on child guidance, anti-biased curriculums and classroom management for the child care provider and adults working with preschool and elementary school aged children in educational settings. Emphasis is placed on the social and emotional development of children from birth through age 8 and developmentally appropriate guidance strategies. This course meets Positive Behavior Support Standards for the Michigan Department of Education

    Prerequisite: None
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 220 Social Emotional Development


    3 credit hours

    Focuses on applying age-appropriate guidance and discipline practices as well as a supportive environment in which children can begin to learn and practice appropriate and acceptable behaviors as individuals and as members of a group.

    Prerequisite: ECE 114 Child Growth and Development   
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ECE 240 Sophomore Seminar II


    1 credit hours

    Candidates continue to build on the professionalism, skills and disposition as they connect essential educational concepts, educational law, current events and best practices as they relate to the profession of education. Candidates will gather and use data to build and implement lesson plans.

    Candidates will continue to work through the early childhood education pathway, clinical field experience requirements as well as additional requirements of the division of education.

    Prerequisite: ECE 140 Freshman Seminar I  
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year

  
  • ECE 244 Observation, Assessment and Analysis of Young Children


    3 credit hours

    Designed to provide the knowledge, understanding and skills of the development and use of appropriate formal and informal assessments of young children and practice conducting and applying appropriate child observation techniques. The application of these skills will be applied through focused observations, the development and use of a variety of assessment tools

    Prerequisite: ECE 114 Child Growth and Development  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ECE 245 Assessment In Early Childhood Education


    3 credit hours

    Designed to give the student knowledge of appropriate formal and informal assessments of young children and practice conducting and applying objective child observation techniques. Focused observations will include physical, emotional, social, cognitive, language, and creative domains in view of sound child guidance techniques. Forty hours of observation in a child care center and a complete case study are required.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2020, WI 2022
  
  • ECE 246 Observation, Assessment and Analysis of Young Children


    3 credit hours

    Designed to provide the knowledge, understanding and skills of the development and use of appropriate formal and informal assessments of young children and practice conducting and applying appropriate child observation techniques. The application of these skills will be applied through focused observations, the development and use of a variety of assessment tools.

    Prerequisite: ECE 114 Child Growth and Development  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  • ECE 285 Special Topics


    1-3 credit hours

    Dependent upon topic. 

    Course is Offered: Uncertain
  
  • ECE 300 Emergent Literacy: Birth to 8 years


    3 credit hours

    This course examines current theory and best practices related to the acquisition of early literacy skills. The course explores the sequence of oral and written language, the role of literature and the environment, emerging reading processes, writing, speaking and listening behaviors as well as examining the role of parents and strategies to support the literacy development of young children birth to 8 years. Two observations are required.

    Prerequisite: ECE 114 Child Growth and Development   and ECE 160 Infant and Toddler Curriculum  and ECE 170 Methods and Materials for Young Children  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year
  
  
  • ECE 340 Junior Seminar III


    1 credit hours

    Candidates continue to strengthen and apply early childhood educational concepts through the development, implementation, and assessment of learner centered lesson activities. Candidates continue to develop skills, content knowledge and disposition through reflective practices and clinical field experiences. Candidates will continue to work through the early childhood pathway, clinical field experience requirements, development of the professional portfolio, as well as additional requirements of the division of education.

    Prerequisite: ECE 240 Sophomore Seminar II   
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 345 Early Literacy: Birth To 5 Years


    3 credit hours

    Examines theory related to the acquisition of early literacy skills. This course explores the sequence of oral and written language, the role of literature and the environment, emerging reading behaviors/processes, the role of parents and strategies to support the literacy development of young children birth to 5 years. Two observations are required.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2019, WI 2021
  
  • ECE 350 Science and Technology for Young Children


    3 credit hours

    Candidates will use current research, theories, and practices regarding the early development of scientific understandings and scientific reasoning. Strategies for supporting children’s exploration and understanding of the world through inquiry-based, hands-on activities, and integrated teaching strategies will be used.

    Science learning at this level will focus on preparing environments for using the five senses to explore a wide range of objects/phenomena and their properties to identify patterns, testing children’s own ideas in a systematic way using a variety of materials, reasoning and arguing from evidence, making thinking public and critiquing the thinking of others, creating and interpreting increasingly complex text and participating in and supporting a culture of talk.

    Prerequisite: ECE 114 Child Growth and Development   and ECE 160 Infant and Toddler Curriculum  and ECE 170 Methods and Materials for Young Children  
    Course is Offered: WI Every Year

  
  • ECE 355 Programs For Young Children


    3 credit hours

    A course designed to examine historical and philosophical foundations of early childhood education; to raise awareness of special abilities, disabilities, and cultural diversities of children; and to learn parent involvement and conference techniques. The main focus is on planning, implementing, and evaluating a developmentally appropriate curriculum approach for infants, toddlers, preprimary, and primary school children. Six hours of field experience required.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: FA 2019, FA 2021
  
  • ECE 360 Social Studies Methods for Young Children


    3 credit hours

    Candidates will use current research, theories, content knowledge, pedagogy, and practices regarding the early development of social studies.  To include topics such as civil engagement, economics, history, community, families while supporting children’s exploration and understanding of the world through inquiry-based, hands-on activities, and integrated teaching strategies.

    Prerequisite: ECE 114 Child Growth and Development   and ECE 160 Infant and Toddler Curriculum  and ECE 170 Methods and Materials for Young Children  
    Course is Offered: FA Every Year
  
  • ECE 365 Family/Community Partnerships In Early Childhood


    3 credit hours

    Knowledge and understanding of family/community characteristics and the critical role both play in children’s development and advocacy. Focus on communication strategies that support and empower families through respectful, reciprocal relationships and the importance of forming positive home/school partnerships.

    Prerequisite:
    Course is Offered: WI 2020, WI 2022
  
 

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